Map Editing

Most Stewardship activities in LANDSCAPE have maps that contain important spatial information related to the activity. Each map is generally edited in the same way though some maps are limited to certain types of shapes based on the activity being mapped.

Map Basics

Each map has the same basic functionality. In the upper left of the map are controls for zooming in and out and a button for panning the map around. You can also zoom into a point on the map by double-clicking on it. If you are using a mobile device with a touchscreen, the standard gestures for zooming in and out of the map work. If you are using a mouse with a mouse wheel, you may find zooming more convenient it.

There are different basemaps available. By default the aerial imagery map view is shown. To show the topo/street map, click the Basemap chooser button in the upper right of the map.

Map Editing

The shapes that are available to draw on the map are dependent on the activity which you are editing.

Each of the shapes are added and edited in the same way. We will demonstrate by adding a polygon to the map. Click the Draw Polygon button in the map toolbar.

When the button is selected, it will highlight. Click on the map where you want your first point. Subsequent clicks will add more points. Don't worry if you make a mistake, you can edit your points later. Clicking again on the first point or double clicking will complete the polygon. 

Click the Pan Map/Edit Features button, then click on the polygon to edit it. You do not need to click the Draw polygon button to edit an existing polygon.

To edit points on the polygon, click and drag one of the vertices. You can add a new point on a line of the polygon by clicking and dragging the 'ghosted' vertex in the middle of the line. Single clicking on a point will remove it.

Stop editing by clicking anywhere outside the polygon.

To delete the entire polygon and start over, click the Delete feature button on the map toolbar, then click anywhere inside the polygon. You will be prompted to confirm your delete.

Each of the shapes are edited in this way.

On some maps, certain shape layers will not be visible but not editable. For example, when editing a monitoring visit, you will see the placement of any Baseline points of interest, but you can not edit them. They are there for reference only.

Editing the Data Associated with a Shape

Some activities store additional data with each shape on the map. For example, Baseline points and polygons can each have names, descriptions, and photos.

With the Pan button selected, clicking on a shape that has associated data will slide open an editor window. Here is an example of the editor for point or area of interest:

 

Importing Shape Data into a Map

If you have existing GIS data you want to import into LANDSCAPE, there are a few different options. Click on the Import Map Data button on the map toolbar.

LANDSCAPE can import your GIS Data in three different ways:

1. Import ESRI Shapefiles. Shapefiles are a common format used by ESRI software. Shapefiles are actually made up of several different files. Most of which must be provided to LANDSCAPE in order to import the data. To accomplish this, locate the shapefile or shapefiles you wish to import and compress all of them into a single .zip file. Click the Import button and a page will open asking you to select from three options. Choose the first option.

 

 

Next, click the Choose Files button and select the .zip file you want to upload.

Then, press the Upload button.

When the upload completes, press the Close button.

Any shapes found in the uploaded shapefile that are compatible with the current map were added. For example, if a shapefile was included in the .zip package that consisted of line features, it would not be imported into a Tract map, which only supports polygons.

2. Import a GPX file of waypoints and/or tracks. Another method for uploading data is importing a .gpx file. These are a standard file type that most GPS unit software supports for transferring waypoint and track data. The Garmin software, Base Camp, for example, will save these types of files.

To import a .gpx file, click the Import Data button on the map you wish to import into and select the second option in the Import Data page that opens.

Next, click the Choose Files button and select the .gpx file you want to upload.

Then, press the Upload button.

When the upload completes, press the Close button.

GPX files support points and line features. Only those features supported by the current map will be imported.

3. Import geotagged photos. A convenient way to upload data into a map is from geotagged photos taken with a smartphone or camera with built-in GPS functionality. Uploading one or more photos in this way will create points of interest on the map and add the photos to them automatically. If the photos were taken within a close distance of each other, a single point will be created for all of the photos within that area. The accuracy of this function depends on the accuracy of the GPS unit inside your camera, however.

To import photos, click the Import Data button on the map you wish to import into and select the third option in the Import Data page that opens.

Next, click the Choose Files button and select one or more photos.

Then, press the Upload button.

When the upload completes, press the Close button.

Photos can only be imported into maps that support point features. However, the only map that doesn't support point features is the Tract boundary map.

 

Importing Tract Boundaries in Builk

If you have one or more shapefiles that contain the boundaries for your Tracts, you can import them all at once. The polygons in the shapefile(s) must have an attribute named "TractId" that corresponds to the External Id field of existing Tracts in LANDSCAPE.

From the Settings Menu, choose the Data Import tab. Click the Import ESRI Shapefiles as Tract Boundaries link button. 

 

 

 

 

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